After arriving in Beirut, the 65-year-old issued a statement to the media, saying: “I have not fled justice. I have escaped injustice and political persecution.”

He went on to attack the Japanese legal system, in which he claims “guilt is presumed, discrimination is rampant, and basic human rights are denied, in flagrant disregard of Japan’s legal obligations under international law and treaties it is bound to uphold”.

He continued: “I can now finally communicate freely with the media,” adding that he would start to do so next week.”

One of Ghosn’s Japanese lawyers, Junichiro Hironaka, told reporters in the country that they knew nothing about Ghosn leaving the country, and were still in possession of his passports. Hironaka said: “We told the court that we are in a bind as well. If he actually left this country, it violates the conditions for bail.” He added: “I don’t even know if we can contact him.”

An official at the Lebanese foreign ministry told Reuters Ghosn had entered the country legally using his French passport and Lebanese ID.

According to the Japan Times, the Tokyo District Court has confirmed that the terms of Ghosn’s bail remained unchanged, which suggests he left the country without permission. According to further reports, the Japanese Immigration Services Agency has no records of Ghosn’s departure. 

Ghosn, who was born in Brazil, has Lebanese parents and lived in the country from the age of six until he left to attend university in Paris. Notably, Lebanon has no extradition agreement with Japan.

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